Monthly Wrap Up – January 2016

Monthly Wrap Up

January was completely fantastic. That’s all I can say about it. If every month of this year is this good, it will go down as the best reading year ever. I don’t think I hated one book. Srsly. I was only slightly disappointed in Dumplin’. I think that’s pretty darn spectacular. I read:

1. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
2. Paper Girls, Issue 3 by Brian K. Vaughan
3. Giant Days, Issue 10 by John Allison
4. The Fade Out, Issue by 12 Ed Brubaker
5. Something New by Lucy Knisley
6. Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho
7. The Fox and the Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith
8. The Fall of the House of West by Paul Pope
9. The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg
10. Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt
11. Paper Girls, Issue 4 by Brian K. Vaughan
12. Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy
13. The Dinner by Herman Koch

I’m hard pressed to pick a favorite. Mr. Splitfoot was weird and wonderful. The Dinner was masterful. The Sorcerer to the Crown was just plan fun. We Should All Be Feminists was empowering and bold. The Fox and the Star smelled good and was gorgeous; plus beloved friends conspired to get it for me. Plus I loved all the comics and graphic novels I read. I hope all the months of 2016 are this spectacular.

How was your January? Read anything good?

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

IT'S MONDAY!

hidingplacelittlelifemygrandmotherthesculptor
Oh my, but am I reading all the things or what? I hope I haven’t bitten off more than I can chew, but….

I’m reading The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom for my Dead Ladies Project.

I’m reading A Little Life with Andi.

I’m listening My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry because I needed a break from Alexander Hamilton.

And I’m reading The Sculptor for Comics February.

*gasp* Thank God I’m loving them all!

What are your plans for the reading week? Reading anything good this week?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

 

Currently // A Little Life

Right this minute | Sitting on the couch, after the kids bounced me awake, blogging this, and wishing for more sleep.

Feeling | Snotty. Very, very snotty.

Reading | I read the majority of The Dinner by Herman Koch yesterday, basically ignoring everyone and the chores, and OMG IT WAS WORTH IT. Next, I started reading A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara after finally caving at the B&N Friday night. I’m bring Andi down into this 800+ page monstrosity with me. Also, I finally decided on Corrie Ten Boom as my first lady for my Dead Ladies Project and started The Hiding Place by the lady herself.

Listening | I started My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman on Friday and was instantly delighted. It was exactly what I needed and the reader, Joan Walker, is completely delightful. I can’t get enough of Backman’s writing.

Watching | We’re finally getting into the second season and Longmire and WOW. It just gets better and better! I’m binge-watching Psyche with the girl and it is awesome. Just hearing her laugh makes it worth it, even though the show IS pretty good.

Blogging | I added a page to my blog that features a list of a LOT of the ladies I want to read about for my project. I have two columns, those I want to read about, and those I have. One is a LOT longer than the other, but I’m working on it!

Promoting | Book Blogger Appreciation Week is in TWO WEEKS!!!!

Loving | My cats. They have been cuddling me while I read and act snotty.

Hating | The snot.

Eating | Nothing yet. Had a fantastic dinner of popcorn last night, so I’m pretty hungry though!

Anticipating | Book Blogger Appreciation Week!!

Have a great week!

Top Ten Tuesday – My Dead Ladies Project

 

CapriciousReader.com Presents

Last year, I read a book called The Dead Ladies Project by Jessa Crispin and it really spoke to me. I decide to undertake a (starkly different!) version of my own and read more about (or by) women who interest me. I have a pretty extensive list of ladies I want to learn from, but I picked a random ten for today’s Top Ten Tuesday. I want not only to learn about what they did, but what made them the way they were. What made them tick, so to speak.

Ida B. Wells – A few years ago, back when I first started listening to podcasts, I listened a fantastic one on Ida B. Wells (link to the cast) by The History Chicks and I was immediately interested in this great lady. She did many pioneering things for blacks and women, but she’s probably best known for her work crusade against lynching.

Margaret Fuller – I first read about Margaret Fuller in American Bloomsbury by Susan Cheever and it only made me want to learn more about this remarkable woman. She was Thoreau’s first editor, Emerson’s close friend,  the first female war correspondent, and did a great many things before dying tragically shortly after she reached the age of 40.

Margaret Knight – Whenever you go to the store and get a flat bottomed bag, you have Margaret Fuller to thank. She constructed a device to fold and glue the bottoms together. A man stole her design and got a patent on it. She successfully filed a patent interference lawsuit. She created her own company and received royalties for her work. She invented many other things AND I CANNOT FIND A BIOGRAPHY ON HER. Just kids books. I guess I have some searching to do.

Harriet Quimby – Harriet Quimby was one of the first women to fly a plane, was the first woman to fly the English Channel, and found success in Hollywood as a screenwriter. And all before she died at the age of 37.

Lillian Moller Gilbreth – You may or may not recognize her name, but she is the lady who wrote Cheaper by the Dozen, the book the movie was based on. What you may not know is, well, I’m going to let Wikipedia tell a bit here, because seriously, she did SO MUCH; she:  was an American psychologist and industrial engineer. One of the first working female engineers holding a Ph.D., she is held to be the first true industrial/organizational psychologist. She and her husband Frank Bunker Gilbreth, Sr. were efficiency experts who contributed to the study of industrial engineering in fields such as motion study and human factors. The books Cheaper by the Dozenand Belles on Their Toes (written by their children Ernestine and Frank Jr.) tell the story of their family life with their twelve children, and describe how they applied their interest in time and motion study to the organization and daily activities of such a large family.

Jeanette Rankin – I haven’t found a book on this lady that I think will be comprehensive enough, but I have to find one. She was the first lady elected to Congress. How could I NOT want to learn about her?

Isabelle Eberhardt – From the book description: Eberhardt’s journal chronicles the daring adventures of a late 19th- century European woman who traveled the Sahara desert disguised as an Arab man and adopted Islam. Wow, right?

Sofia Tolstoy – I hate to admit it (or maybe not?), but I’ve never found Leo Tolstoy very interesting. I tried to read War & Peace and, well, let’s just say it didn’t go well. Sofia on the other hand, she sounds interesting. How DID she put up with that man? I WANT TO KNOW.

Helen Pitts Douglass – Love came to me, and I was not afraid to marry the man I loved because of his color. She was the second wife of Frederick Douglass. There is little written about her, so I will look for her in her husband’s writings.

Daisy and Violet Hilton – Conjoined Twins. Freak show notoriety. Vaudeville stardom. Crash landing. Good golly geeeeeez fascinating.

toptentuesday

Hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. More HERE.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

monday

 

I don’t know about you guys, but I feel like I have a reading hangover. I’ve been snowed in at my house since Friday and what’s a reader gonna do? A reader is gonna read and that is exactly what I did. And now, as you can see, I am reading 4 books. Egads.

The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is going the slowest. It started out great, but now that Bailey is getting into snail history…well, as you can imagine, my eyes are drifting. I started The Dinner right after finishing Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy and ermagerd I can tell this is going to be an AMAZING book. The tension is building and I’m only 50+ pages in. I’m still listening to Alexander Hamilton and will be until the end of time. Just kidding but y’all. This book is LONG. Lastly, I used a new app I found called Glose to download, and read, 1984 by George Orwell for free. I love that word. Free. It rolls so lovely off the tongue, yes?

 

What are your plans for the reading week? Reading anything good this week?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

40 Before 40: a Birthday List

MORGANS

My birthday is in a couple or three days. I will be 38 years old. I am not willing to call it a “mid-life crisis” or anything, but it just hit me a few days ago that I will actually be forty soon. And there are a lot of things I haven’t done. Yet. And in those things are included a few books I’d like to read before then. So, I went, did some research, and came up with a list of 40 books I would like to read before I turn 40. Some are old. Some are new. All are important, at least to me. I have 24 months, so I figure about 2 a month should do it. (And of course, I reserve the right to change it up between now and then!) Here is my list:

  1. 1984 by George Orwell
  2. The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elizabeth Tova Bailey
  3. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  4. Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women by Nora Ephron
  5. Oak: One Tree, Three Years, Fifty Paintings” By Stephen Taylor
  6. Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel B. Smith
  7. Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown
  8. Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward
  9. Dear Life: Stories by Alice Munroe
  10. Home by Toni Morrison
  11. Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou
  12. Survival Lessons by Alice Hoffman
  13. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James
  14. Blue Nights by Joan Didion
  15. Franny and Zooey by JD Salinger
  16. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  17. Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine
  18. Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  19. The God of Small Things: A Novel by Arundhati Roy
  20. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
  21. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  22. Balm by Dolen Perkins-Valdez
  23. My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem
  24. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger
  25. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
  26. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
  27. The Road by Cormac McCarthy
  28. The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls
  29. Blindness by Jose Saramago
  30. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
  31. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  32. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  33. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
  34. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  35. In True Blood by Truman Capote
  36. Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion
  37. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
  38. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  39. The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson
  40. Recovering: A Journal by May Sarton

What do you think? What would you add to my list? What would you take away?

Thoughts on Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt

Thoughts on Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha HuntMr. Splitfood
by Samantha Hunt
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
on January 5, 2016
Genres: Contemporary Fiction, Fantasy, Horror
Pages: 336
Format: eBook
Source: Friend
Goodreads
Amazon
five-stars
A contemporary gothic from an author in the company of Kelly Link and Aimee Bender, Mr. Splitfoot tracks two women in two times as they march toward a mysterious reckoning.

Ruth and Nat are orphans, packed into a house full of abandoned children run by a religious fanatic. To entertain their siblings, they channel the dead. Decades later, Ruth’s niece, Cora, finds herself accidentally pregnant. After years of absence, Aunt Ruth appears, mute and full of intention. She is on a mysterious mission, leading Cora on an odyssey across the entire state of New York on foot. Where is Ruth taking them? Where has she been? And who — or what — has she hidden in the woods at the end of the road?

In an ingeniously structured dual narrative, two separate timelines move toward the same point of crisis. Their merging will upend and reinvent the whole. A subversive ghost story that is carefully plotted and elegantly constructed, Mr. Splitfoot will set your heart racing and your brain churning. Mysteries abound, criminals roam free, utopian communities show their age, the mundane world intrudes on the supernatural and vice versa.

You guys. I am so gullible; I mean; it really doesn’t take much to talk me into trying out a book. I tried this book because:

  1. Andi told me to
  2. It’s compared to Kelly Link in the first line of the book description
  3. There are orphans. And a road trip. And religious fanatics.
  4. But basically because Andi told me to.

Do you ever read a book that you just totally loved, even though you know you didn’t totally GET IT? This is me with Mr. Splitfoot and it’s also why I know I’ll be rereading it in a year or so. I just know there is so much I missed. Yet I loved it. Basically, all I can say is that. I loved this book and I don’t know what else to say. Andi said that was perfect, so, there you go.

I loved it and I just don’t even know. It’s just so goooood. Read it.

Top Ten Tuesday – Okay, so this may have been too easy…

Top Ten Tuesday

As I started thinking about this week’s topic, the typical amount of guilt burbled to the surface. I know I buy to many books. I spend too much money on them. Everyone one of these ten books was bought this year, and it’s only January 19th (in my defence, they WERE on sale). However, yesterday morning, I read this post from Paper Fury and, strangely, felt a little better. Give it a read and dude, do not feel back about having a huge TBR! Because it is Perfectly Acceptable to Have a Huge TBR because really, who wants to collect pine cones?

Plus, at the end of the day, I’ve already read several of these.

The Oddfits by Tiffany Tsao – An eight year old called Murgatroyd Floyd? That cover? The fact that I MYSELF AM AN ODDFIT? And it was on sale.

Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words by Randall Munroe – I looooooved What If? and hey! It was ALSO on sale.

Survival Lessons by Alice Hoffman – I love Alice Hoffman’s work. I can’t imagine how amazing this very personal book, written after a life changing diagnosis, is. And yes, it was also on sale.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – Adichie is an author I’ve been meaning to read for awhile. This was the perfect place to start. Yes, I’ve already read it, and I LOVED it.

The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge – In a recent Twitter discussion, I realized, yet again, that have not read any Hardinge. This one sounded good.

Giant Days #10 by John Allison – No one yet realizes just how GREAT MY LOVE IS for this little comic. But they will. THEY `WILL. I have a subscription to this comic, so it automatically BOUGHT ITSELF.

The Fade Out #12 by Ed Brubaker – I love love love, wait, loved, this comic. This was the last issue and I am all the sad. It was so great.

Morning Glories Volume 1 by Nick Spencer – Since The Fade Out is over, I have room in my life for a new series. This one is up for consideration.

Paper Girls 3 and Paper Girls 4 by Brian K. Vaughan – I looooove BKV’s work, so of course I had to check out this new series. I wasn’t too sure about it at first, but then I read issue 3 and now I’m completely hooked.

The Revenant by Michael Punke – I really really want to see the movie, so of course I have to read the book.

Have you read any of these? What did you recently buy? Do you feel guilty when you buy a book? Or two?

toptentuesday

Hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. More HERE.

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

monday

Good morning! Happy MLK Day! Big plans? None here. Just sit around, do a few chores, and of course, read!

The Lie Tree and Dumplin’ are tentative reads, as I am not very far enough into either one of them to say I’m Committed yet. I spent most of the last two days finishing up Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt and, just, whoa. Let’s just say that Dumplin’ and The Lie Tree are complete changes of pace, and for good reason.

I’ve listened to over a quarter of Alexander Hamilton now (the book, not the musical – silly, I’ve been through that several times now) and, you know, wow. He lived quite the life! I can’t wait to listen to more. Perhaps during the chores?

What are your plans for the reading week? Reading anything good?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

 

Currently // It’s Snowing!!!

Right this minute | It’s snowing!

12472233_10156330604640618_7664012187505636672_n

Feeling | Something childlike and innocent wakes in me when it snows.  A throwback to simpler days when snow meant life slowed down and narrowed into time spent reading, watching tv, and not worrying about going anywhere or doing anything. It’s a precious time.

Reading | Thanks to the 24 in 48 readathon I have read a lot this weekend. It has been lovely! So far I have read The Fall of the House of West by Paul Pope and The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg. And I’m almost finished with Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt. I’m not sure what’s next. I’m fighting the Gobbledybooks.

Listening | I have been alternating between Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow and Hamilton: the Musical recording all week long. Let’s call it immersion.

Watching | Still working on Longmire, WHICH IS SO GOOD.

Blogging & Promoting | Oh just a little something called….

Book-blogger-1-768x768

Loving | All the excitement that I’m seeing for BBAW. So glad Amy let us bring it back. I’ve missed it so.

Hating | The kids fighting is at the top at the moment. And their lack of listening skills. I’m not sure who listens better: the 12 YO girl or the 8YO boy.

Eating | Have been eating lots of salads, fruits, and such this week. It’s been great!

Anticipating | Finishing my book and watching the snow!

Have a great week everyone!